QuittnerSlatalla1998speeding


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auther



bibtex

en

@book{QuittnerSlatalla1998speeding,
 title={{Speeding the net: the inside story of Netscape and how it challenged Microsoft}},
 author={Quittner, J. and Slatalla, M.},
 isbn={0871137097},
 year={1998},
 publisher={Atlantic Monthly Press}
}

ja

@book{QuittnerSlatalla1998speeding,
 title={{Speeding the net: the inside story of Netscape and how it challenged Microsoft}},
 author={Quittner, J. and Slatalla, M.},
 isbn={0871137097},
 year={1998},
 publisher={Atlantic Monthly Press},
 note ={{(安蒜泰樹訳,
 マイクロソフトへの挑戦 : ネットスケープはいかにしてマイクロソフトに挑んだのか,
 毎日コミュニケーションズ (1999))}}
}

format for references

CIRIEC Japan

Quittner, J. and Slatalla, M. [1998] 『Speeding the net: the inside story of Netscape and how it challenged Microsoft』Atlantic Monthly Press (安蒜泰樹訳 [1999] 『マイクロソフトへの挑戦 : ネットスケープはいかにしてマイクロソフトに挑んだのか』 毎日コミュニケーションズ)

abstract



memo

プロローグ

pp. 9ja

アンドリーセンとその友人、エリック・ピーナは、原型となるコードを1992年から93年にまたがる冬の数週間で書き上げた。

p. 64en, pp. 92ja

So it was no wonder that they were invited to go to Boston in Julyk where O'Reilly & Associates was sponsoring a World Wide Web Wizards Workshop.  

/*snip*

O'Reilly hoped to work more closely with developers to make sure that, while different browsers that displayed documents might come and go, all the documents--that is, all content--would be written in a universal format. This was tricker than it sounded. Was it possible, for instance, for the Web to support new graphical browsers like Mosaic while remaining compatible with text-based browser?

/*snip*

As soon as beta versions of Mosaic for Mac and for Windows had been publicly released, NCSA's server had ...

/*snip*

The developers of the Midas browser and the Cello browser were there.

p. 69en

For Dale Dougherty of O'Reilly this was widespread accessibility of Mosaic raised a fundamental question: Who was going to control the future direction of the Web?

Two camps were emerging at the workshop. On one hand, the Web was Tim Berners-Lee's creation, and Berners-Lee argued ferventry that developers should agree on standard approaches to writing software. Berners-Lee didn't want the Web to evolve into, say, sixteen different Webs, each accessible only with a single browser.

HTML had been developed as a kind of generic language that an auther would use to convey text. But HTML didn't dictate any graphical parameters for how a document would be presented on-screen. That was fine with Berners-Lee; in fact, it wa almost a mantra. He kept making the point that he wanted users with text-only monitors to have the same equal experience on the Web as users who had fancier computers with graphical capabilities.

Berners-Lee said he thought the basic idea behind the markup language was the content it conveyed. Let each individual user decide how to display it, rather than creating a browser that dictated how content should be displayed.

It wa a purist's view, an idealist's view, and the Mosaic team saw it was holding back the Web. They understood Berners-Lee, certainly, but they were on the other side of the argument. He wanted to do the pure thing; they wanted to create a browser that did fun and cool things.

p. 70en

It was clear, from the tenor of the workshop and the growing importance of Mosaic, that Andreesen would assume a position of leadership in determining the future of Web development. And his attitude toward change was anything but moderate. If he thought of a new future for his browser, he simply sat down and banged it out. He didn't call for a committee vote.

p. 71en

Dougherty sensed that some in the room worried that Andreessen and Bina's creation would take off on its own, leaving the rest of the Web behind.



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